Production

 

The production takes place only in the time between November and March. Besides, the olive oil is merged in big kettles with water released soda. The mixture is heated up to more than 200 degrees and is stirred until the olive oil disintegrates completely into glycerine and the sodium salt of the olive oil.

Shortly before the finishing process, laurel oil is added. The final act is done by the boiling master trough "tasting" the "salt free" soap and completing the process. The soda solution is let down from the kettle and the soap mixture washed out with fresh water till it is completely free of lye. After the water is let out, the soap is left over night for cooling and dewatering.
 

Alepeo Seife wird angerührt
Alepeo Seife wird angerührt

Heiße Seife wird gegossen
Heiße Seife wird gegossen

ALEPEO Seifenblock
ALEPEO Seifenblock

Alepeo Seife wird angerührt
Alepeo Seife wird angerührt

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Now the still warm light green paste is equably distributed on a prepared ground and is let there for some hours for hardening. With a hand cutter the raw soap is cut in cubes and is stamped with the company's name and classification.

Before the soap can be brought to the market, it must mature at least six months, to dry completely. To achieve this, the bars are stacked in particularly ventilated vaults. The stacking is time-consuming because you need to leave space all around the bars to give the appearance the opportunity to crust. The surface of the olive-green soap oxidizes to the typical, ochre colour shade during the inside of the soap remains olive-green. The thickness of the ochre colored shift marks the age of the soap. The olive-green shares also mark the high interest in vitamin E


 

What is the difference between the Aleppo soap and the olive oil-bay oil soap? And what, in turn, is laurel soap or laurel butter soap?

 

The answer to these questions is relatively simple. There is simply none as long as the original soap is from the city of Aleppo in northern Syria. All names refer to the same soap. In Arabic the soap is called "Sapun Ghar", which translated means laurel soap. Therefore the term "laurel soap" would be meaningful if translated literally. At Alepp, however, we decided on the term "olive oil-laurel oil soap" because both components are very important and it is precisely their combination that makes the soap from Aleppo.

 

The original is a mixture of the main ingredients olive oil and bay oil and the manufacturing process is the same as it was more than 1000 years ago. Only the mixing ratio of the oils can vary. Mixtures of 2% - 40% bay oil are common, with the most common ratio being 85% olive oil and 15% bay oil. Usually the soap is made in the winter months, dried for 6-9 months and sold the following year.

 

Many manufacturers leave a certain amount of residue in their warehouses for the season after next, as there are also consumers who prefer an older soap. Due to the longer drying time, this then has a thicker outer layer and is much harder. There is a modified form of the traditionally produced olive oil and laurel oil soap, the pure olive oil soap. It is made only from olive oil, is relatively light in color (cream-colored) and can be compared to the Marseille soap. Only small quantities of this soap are produced, most of which are also exported.